How to use an electric japanese toilet

You’ve probably seen or heard about Japanese toilets – the ones with all the buttons, not the squat type that has been helpfully illustrated on the right. Referred to as a washlet, this kind of toilet is getting pretty famous across the world, and with good reason. They come with a number of functions to make a trip to the bathroom more (or less, depending on your perspective) comfortable.

The most famous producer of these high-tech toilets is TOTO and they not only put a lot of effort into comfort and style (the newest models could even be called stylish), but also into conserving water. The problem is… how do you even flush these things??

so says

I don’t usually use so many functions but I always use the seat heater in winter. I REALLY hated to go to the toilet on a winter morning when I was a child because it was like sitting on ice. Every time before sitting on the toilet, I had to get ready to endure hardship, clenching my fist tight and saying, “EEEEEEEEEE”. That’s why my mind was blown when I used the seat heater for the first time. The washlet could be said to symbolize the Japanese national character because it’s a product developed in the pursuit of comfort and attentiveness to others. These days, companies put effort into developing a flush system that uses less water, so it’s very eco-friendly. I love it!  

1 %
recommendation

Specially use it in a winter morning.

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User friendly interface

machine type

word list

止まる/とまる/tomaru

Depending on the toilet, this will stop either the water spray or any function you’re using at the time.

おしり/oshiri

Use this for a spray that will wash your rear.

ビデ/びで/bide

This will produce a spray for women to wash.

音/おと/oto

Japanese people are very private, and don’t want to share their bathroom sounds. If you’re embarrassed about the sounds made when using the toilet, try this button for a masking flushing sound without the water waste. Sometimes this button is actually a touch sensor, so don’t be surprised if you accidentally set it off.

Interesting fact: In Japan this is known as oto-hime, or princess sound. Because princess don’t make bathroom noises.   

水勢/すいせい/suisei 洗浄強さ/せんじょうつよさ/senjyoutsuyosa

音量/おんりょう/onryou

Just in case you need it super loud.

音停止/おとていし/ototeishi

パワー脱臭/ぱわーだっしゅう/pawa-dasshu

To help eliminate smells more quickly.

便座/べんざ/benza

For a warm seat. Usually this can’t be controlled in a public toilet and it’s set automatically.

温水/おんすい/onsui

洗浄位置/せんじょういち/senjyouichi

To adjust the position of the water spray nozzle.

やわらか/yawaraka マイルド/まいるど/mairudo

For a gentler water spray.

ノズル洗浄/のずるせんじょう/nozuru senjyou

This cleans the spray nozzle automatically.

ワイド洗浄/わいどせんじょう/waido senjyou

Produces a more dispersed spray than the normal one.

ムーブ/むーぶ/mu-bu

Sometimes there is a rhythmical water pressure spray function like the electric parade at Disneyland. So you don’t have to move to get to the right places.

リズム切/りずむきる/rizumu kiru

Stop the rhythmical spray.

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